CALL US: 1800-753-0472
 

Smoke

 

Different smoke odors and residues are left behind in structures after fires of all sizes. At ZeesGroup we are prepared to deal with all varieties of these smoke odors and residues.

•  Protein residues are left behind from over cooked and burned meat, fish, or poultry. Left behind is a residue ranging in color from yellow to brown and can get into paints, floor coverings, wood and plastics. As long as the surface with residue is wet cleanable, this type of residue can be efficiently cleaned using water based cleaning solutions. This is one of the most difficult types of odor to get rid of.

•  Dry smoke residues, also referred to as natural substance residues and odors, come from more combustible and fast burning sources such as paper or wood. These odors and residues can be left behind by things such as campfires, traditional fire places, or a furnace puff back. What’s left behind are residues that range from grey to black in color and have a dry, powdery texture. Natural residue is removed using dry cleaning and preconditioning of the surface, before moving on to a wet cleaning technique. Dry smoke residues are one of the easier types of odor to clean and deodorize.

•  Synthetic residues and oily smoke residues are the result of burned materials that are synthetic. These residues are left behind such items as grease fires, burnt plastic, and carpeting. A heavy black smeary residue is left behind, which can be easily vacuumed if left alone. However, when this residue is touched and smeared it gets into the surface and will then require additional cleaning steps to remove. This type of residue is resistant to water based cleaning solutions.

•  Wet smoke residues are the result of water being used to extinguish a fire using a sprinkler system or fire hoses from the fire department. The residues left behind are smeary and have a strong smoke and musty odor. These residues and odors usually require wet cleaning; using water based cleaning solutions, to be removed.

Several influences of smoke behavior help us understand the presence and effect of the different types of residues and odors. Some of these influences are as follows:

 

•  Combustion temperatures
•  Air pressure changes
•  Magnetism
•  Ionization
•  Impingement

100% Satisfaction
Over 25 years experience
Superior quality service
Always delivering on our promise
Insured and bonded
Licensed & Certified

CONTACT US

Office:1.888.828.2227
Fax: 1.888.464.2227
E-Fax: 1.888.933.7476
Email: Sales@zeesgroup.com

Understanding the smoke behavior is important and influences the project survey and the scope of work that needs to be done. Different combustion temperatures affect the surrounding surface materials differently, moving the smoke odors to different surfaces or baking certain residues on some surfaces. Combustion temperatures also create expansion of the air, forcing smoke loaded air into cracks, narrow openings, and empty spaces. Hot are that is full of smoke is drawn to different cold surfaces like outside walls, glass, and metallic surfaces. Depending on the surface, the smoke odors could be deeply seated onto the surface structure.

Metallic surfaces become magnetized when heated during fires and the smoke particles in the air also carry electrical charges in them. When these two charges come together, it causes magnetism. The outline of screw heads and other metallic fasteners begin to show up on sheetrock or other similar materials.

When particles of smoke with opposite charges attract each other, they result in ionization. Formations of smoke chains appear in the upper corners of rooms and drapery pleats or inside of cabinets and drawers. These smoke chains, referred to as smoke webs, show up in different areas as a result of unique air movement. The presence of these different smoke webs from ionization indicates combustion of synthetic materials.

Smoke

 

Different smoke odors and residues are left behind in structures after fires of all sizes. At ZeesGroup we are prepared to deal with all varieties of these smoke odors and residues.

•  Protein residues are left behind from over cooked and burned meat, fish, or poultry. Left behind is a residue ranging in color from yellow to brown and can get into paints, floor coverings, wood and plastics. As long as the surface with residue is wet cleanable, this type of residue can be efficiently cleaned using water based cleaning solutions. This is one of the most difficult types of odor to get rid of.

•  Dry smoke residues, also referred to as natural substance residues and odors, come from more combustible and fast burning sources such as paper or wood. These odors and residues can be left behind by things such as campfires, traditional fire places, or a furnace puff back. What’s left behind are residues that range from grey to black in color and have a dry, powdery texture. Natural residue is removed using dry cleaning and preconditioning of the surface, before moving on to a wet cleaning technique. Dry smoke residues are one of the easier types of odor to clean and deodorize.

•  Synthetic residues and oily smoke residues are the result of burned materials that are synthetic. These residues are left behind such items as grease fires, burnt plastic, and carpeting. A heavy black smeary residue is left behind, which can be easily vacuumed if left alone. However, when this residue is touched and smeared it gets into the surface and will then require additional cleaning steps to remove. This type of residue is resistant to water based cleaning solutions.

•  Wet smoke residues are the result of water being used to extinguish a fire using a sprinkler system or fire hoses from the fire department. The residues left behind are smeary and have a strong smoke and musty odor. These residues and odors usually require wet cleaning; using water based cleaning solutions, to be removed.

Several influences of smoke behavior help us understand the presence and effect of the different types of residues and odors. Some of these influences are as follows:

 

•  Combustion temperatures
•  Air pressure changes
•  Magnetism
•  Ionization
•  Impingement

100% Satisfaction
Over 25 years experience
Superior quality service
Always delivering on our promise
Insured and bonded
Licensed & Certified

CONTACT US

Office:1.888.828.2227
Fax: 1.888.464.2227
E-Fax: 1.888.933.7476
Email: Sales@zeesgroup.com

Understanding the smoke behavior is important and influences the project survey and the scope of work that needs to be done. Different combustion temperatures affect the surrounding surface materials differently, moving the smoke odors to different surfaces or baking certain residues on some surfaces. Combustion temperatures also create expansion of the air, forcing smoke loaded air into cracks, narrow openings, and empty spaces. Hot are that is full of smoke is drawn to different cold surfaces like outside walls, glass, and metallic surfaces. Depending on the surface, the smoke odors could be deeply seated onto the surface structure.

Metallic surfaces become magnetized when heated during fires and the smoke particles in the air also carry electrical charges in them. When these two charges come together, it causes magnetism. The outline of screw heads and other metallic fasteners begin to show up on sheetrock or other similar materials.

When particles of smoke with opposite charges attract each other, they result in ionization. Formations of smoke chains appear in the upper corners of rooms and drapery pleats or inside of cabinets and drawers. These smoke chains, referred to as smoke webs, show up in different areas as a result of unique air movement. The presence of these different smoke webs from ionization indicates combustion of synthetic materials.